Maximum Advantage Roulette Plus

Powerful New Strategies That Take the Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy To a New, So-Far Unbeatable Level!

Introduction

This special book modifies and adds to the roulette gambling strategy described in the manual and toolkit Maximum Advantage Roulette.

The complete manual reveals the dynamic new Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy that is a time-tested strategy that has been tested and proven to:

  • Win $147 an hour making minimum bets in land-based casinos, hour after hour, day after day, week after profitable week.
  • Pull in profits as high as $735 an hour in unsuspecting Internet LIVE casinos that are just waiting to be soundly beaten by this strategy.
  • Win quickly time after time using a copyright protected "hit and run" strategy so effective that most online casinos can be beaten in 16 minutes or less.
  • Create powerful, predictable sources of income that are so reliable that one associate, John D., called this method the "ATM method - just punch in the right numbers and wait for the cash to appear."

The Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy has been exhaustively tested and 100% proven to work. Almost unbelievably, it is documented to win a record breaking 97.75% of the time.

It is so reliable that when you use it, you will make an average return of 30% per hour on the money you risk in any real casino.

What's more, if you play in the faster and even more profitable online casinos, you will more than double your hourly win rate.

In fact, after you work your way up to making $25 wagers, you will make predictable profits of $735 an hour!

Maximum Advantage Roulette is a unique strategy that was developed exclusively for winning at roulette. Instead of "borrowing" one of the old off-the-shelf systems, the Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy uses a system custom tailored to win consistently playing roulette.

It is not complicated. It only requires you to make only one bet at a time.

It is not simplistic like the systems that require you to double up after losses or raise your wager by a fixed amount after winning.

It is a scientifically based system that incorporates a perfected "ratchet principle" to adjust the size of your wagers by just the right amount.

Maybe the best way to describe it is to call it a betting strategy based on the "Goldilocks principle." It is not too hot and not too cold, but just right.

Let me give you an example of how the Maximum Advantage Roulette System protects your bankroll. The Martingale System is one of the oldest around. It calls for doubling your wager after a loss and continuing to double your bet until you eventually win.

If you are wagering $5 and lose, your next bet will be doubled, for $10. If you lose this bet also, you will lay out $20. If you are unfortunate enough to lose this wager too, you will plop down $40 for your next wager. The theory behind this system is that when you eventually win, you will recoup all of your losses plus win the amount of your original bet, for $5. Neat huh?

The problem is that if you have a string of losses, your wagers will get larger and larger. You will be required to risk more and more money on each bet until you reach the house limit and can no longer double your wager.

Here’s an example of a Martingale series - 5 10 20 40 80 160 320 640 . If we assume that the house betting limits are $5 to $1,000, then this is as far as we can go. If we lose the $640 bet, we would be required to wager $1,280 next. If we start to make this bet, the dealer will admonish us, "No more than $1,000, please. "We are defeated. Even with a $2,000 house limit, we can only raise our wager one more time. If we bet $1,280 and lose, our next wager would be for $2,560. Once again the dealer will refuse our wager as it exceeds the house limit.

Besides not being allowed to wager $2,560, we must also stop at this point and question the logic of a system that requires us to risk $2,560 to win the grand sum of $5. Put this way, the Martingale System doesn't seem very smart, does it?

With Martingale, you assume too much risk relative to the final payoff. What if I told you that there is a way to bet that wins at a very high rate, yet has very low risk.

The Controlled Risk Betting Strategy or CRB Strategy is the betting method used in the Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy. It is like no other strategy ever created.

When you use it, you will win a very high percentage of the time. In fact, when you couple it with the rest of the principles used in this system, you will win 97.75% of the time. This is a very high win rate, yet, amazingly, it is done with low risk.

Yet, as high as this win rate is, you can do even better. That's where this supplemental manual comes in. We have discovered ways to increase the win rate even higher. In fact, the methods I am going to show you in this book can be used to lift the Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy as close as is possible to becoming a "perfect playing strategy."

Before I show you how to do this, we need to talk a little more about betting strategies.

Let's take a look at two $5 betters. Mr. A. uses the Martingale "double-up" strategy. Mr. B. chooses the CRB Strategy which is a major component of Maximum Advantage Roulette.

Unfortunately, neither player is very lucky today and they each lose eight consecutive bets. Mr. A. has now lost $1,275 and will be called on to wager $1,280 next.

Mr. B. also has a loss, but it is only for $120. His next bet will be for $15.

First, I want you to notice that while losing eight consecutive bets is close to a disaster for Mr. A., it is only a minor setback for Mr. B. While Mr. B. is also in the hole, his loss of $120 is less than 1/10th the size of Mr. A.'s. Furthermore, Mr. A. has just hit the wall with his betting and cannot increase the size of his wagers any more because of house limits. He is stuck with a $1,275 loss with no way to recoup it.

Mr. B.'s next wager of $15 is well under the maximum bet and the odds are very great that Mr. B. will not only recoup his $120 loss with a few more bets, but win the contest by making a few more astutely timed wagers.

The CRB Strategy gives the player the power to win large amounts at an amazingly high rate.

Using the CRB Betting Strategy, a typical $5 bettor will win $147 an hour in a land-based casino and more than double that in an online casino. I don't know about you, but I am absolutely thrilled to be able to risk a very small amount of money and be able to win $300 an hour playing online with $5-based wagers.

If you decide you want to win more, you can start with $10 wagers or even work your way up, using casino winnings, to $25 wagers.

The documented win rate for Maximum Advantage Roulette, using $25 wagers, is $735 an hour. As an old blonde dealer working in a decrepit sawdust joint casino once told me, "Honey, you're talking my language."

While these are extraordinary results, this strategy has been pushed even further. While a win rate of 97.75% is really extraordinary, you can actually do much, much better than this.

How would you like to reduce the possibility of the loss of your bankroll down as low .338%? Just so we understand this number, I am talking about a system that would entail a major loss once in every 296 games. Another way of saying this is that you could expect to lose a series of games about 3.38 times out of every 1,000 games played.

That is where we are going in this special supplemental manual.

In fact, we will even show you what may be called the "ultimate betting strategy" where a series loss would occur on the average just once every 1,976 games! Here we are talking about modifying the original strategy to the point that the risk of loss is very, very tiny.

I want to be up front with you. I have never had a loss in real play at the "once in every 1,976 games level." However, it is still possible that you could experience a loss. Possible, but not likely.

In the next chapter I am going to review the Controlled Risk Betting Strategy which is the strategy used to determine the size of each bet you make at roulette when you use this system.

The Controlled Risk Betting Strategy

There are two critical components of the Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy. The first component is the Betting Method used, which is called the "Controlled Risk Betting Strategy."

This betting system is used to determine the size of each wager.

The second component of the strategy is "Adaptive Pattern Betting Method," which used to determine where to place your next wager. This is the Bet Selection part of the strategy.

These methods are described in complete detail in the original manual Maximum Advantage Roulette Course & Toolkit.

When you are using the Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy, you will combine both of these components. For example, the CRB Strategy may tell you that your next wager will be for $8.

The APB Method will determine where you place the next wager. It is through the interaction of both components that the overall strategy gains its power.

In this book, we are only going to talk about the component of the overall strategy that determines the size of each wager of the CRB Strategy.

In order to use the complete Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy, you will need to add the APB Method, which determines where you place each bet.

Thus, the discussions that follow only cover part of the complete strategy. Before you decide to test these modifications by playing roulette, you will want to make sure that you are using the complete strategy which is described in the book – Maximum Advantage Roulette Course and Toolkit.

The CRB Strategy is a method for determining the size of every wager you will make before you make the wager. It is not a predefined betting series like a Martingale. You will recall that if you use a Martingale progression, you will double each wager following a loss until you have a winning wager. A Martingale betting series for a table with $5 minimum wagers would be: 5 10 20 40 80 160 320 640 and so on.

There are several problems with using a Martingale type of progression.

  1. A larger bankroll is required. In order to use a Martingale progression, you have to use a bankroll for each game equal in size to the sum of all of the wagers. The above series would require a bankroll of $1,275.
  2. A Martingale progression risks too much in order to win a small amount. If you lost the first seven wagers in the above Martingale series, you would have lost $635 and would be called on to wager $640 in order to recoup your loss and capture a $5 gain. Here the risk is all out of proportion to the potential gain.
  3. While Martingale progressions win frequently, the size of their losses are too large. One loss will wipe out hours of profits.

And, as we have seen earlier, the improbable (like losing seven decisions in a row) occurs often enough in gambling that you can be sure that you will have large losses if you use a Martingale progression.

The CRB Strategy is a flexible strategy where bets can move up and down within a range. By taking this approach, the size of our wagers stays small.

Below is a comparison of seven losing wagers for a Martingale Betting Series and the CRB Strategy using $5 bets as the base bet.

Comparison of Losing Betting Series Martingale vs. CRB Strategy

CRB Strategy - Chart 1

As shown in the table above, if we lose seven consecutive wagers, our loss will equal $1,275 if we use a Martingale Betting System. Unless we have nerves of steel, this loss will end our game and we will walk away with a wallet that is considerably lighter.

If we used the CRB Strategy instead, we would have had a loss of $124. This is much better than losing $1,275, don't you think? What's more, we can continue to play after losing seven bets in a row with the Maximum Advantage Roulette strategy, while a loss using Martingale, will wipe us out.

Let's take a look at how the CRB Strategy is formulated.

How the CRB Strategy Works

The basic betting system for playing at a $5 minimum wager roulette table has the following rules:

  1. The base bet is $5. This is the minimum wager made.
  2. The maximum bet in a game is $27. If this amount is wagered and lost, the following wager will be for $15.
  3. The amount of the wager is increased by $3 following a loss. If we had a series of five straight losses, our wagers would be:

Bet Number 1     2    3       4     5

Amount        $5  $8 $11 $14 $17

  1. The amount of a wager is reduced by $2 following any win. If we have a series of two straight wins, and our first wager was in the amount of $15, our wagers would be: $15 and then $13.
  2. After any two consecutive wins, the amount of the wager is reduced by $5. If we have two consecutive wins, starting with a $15 bet, our bets would be:

Bet 1     Wins Bet 2     Wins Bet 3 Placed

$15             $13                      $8

The next table shows a series of 15 wagers made using the base betting series. To keep matters simple, we won't worry about where the wagers were placed.

A Series of Bets Made With $5 Minimum Wagers

CRB Strategy - Chart 2

 

It is very important that you understand how to determine the size of your wagers. Let's go through this example decision by decision and see how each bet was determined.

Each decision below corresponds to the decision number (#) in Table 2.

  1. This was our first wager. We always start a game with our basic bet in accordance with Rule A.
  2. We lost our first wager. Following a loss, we use Rule C to determine the next wager. Our next wager is the amount of the previous lost wager plus $3, or 5 + 3 = 8. We wager $8.
  3. We lost again. Once again we follow Rule C and add $3 to the amount of our losing wager. We calculate: 8 + 3 = $11. Our next wager is $11.
  4. We won our third wager. Following a single win we use Rule D and reduce our next wager by $2. Our calculation is: 11 – 2 = 9. We wager $9 for decision #4.
  5. We won wager #4. We have now won two bets in a row (#3 and #4). With two consecutive wins, Rule E kicks in and we reduce the size of our next wager by $5. We calculate: 9 - 5 = 4. However, our minimum wager is always at least $5, so our wager size is 5 instead of 4. We wager $5 for decision #5.
  6. We lost Decision #5. Now Rule C determines the size of our wager. We add $3 to our last bet, for: 5 + 3 = 8. We wager $8.
  7. We won wager #6. Following Rule D, our next wager is reduced by $2. We have: 8 - 2 = 6. We wager $6.
  8. We lost #7. Time for Rule C again. We increase our next wager by $3, as 6 + 3 = 9. We wager $9 for decision #8.
  9. Another loss. Rule C still governs. We add $3 to our last wager, for 9 + 3 = 12. Our wager for #9 is $12.
  10. We lost decision #9. We follow Rule C and add another $3 to our previous wager, for 12 + 3 = 15. Our wager for #10 is for $15.
  11. Hurray, we finally won. With a win on #10, we follow Rule D and drop our next bet by $2. The next bet is determined as 15 - 2 = 13. We bet $13 for decision #11.
  12. Back to the losing column as wager #11 loses. Rule C governs and we add $3 to our previous wager for, 13 + 3 = 16. We wager $16 on decision #12.
  13. We win #12. Back to Rule D. We cut the size of this bet by $2, as 16 - 2 = 14. Our wager is for $14.
  14. Another win. We have won two bets in a row. This brings Rule E into play. We reduce the size of our next bet by $5. We calculate: 14 - 5 = 9. We bet $9.
  15. Decision $14 wins. Since we have won two in a row, we knock down the size of the next bet by $5. We calculate: 9 – 5 = 4. Since our minimum bet is still $5, we wager $5.
  16. We win Decision #15. If we were to continue our next bet would be for $5 again and we can't reduce the size or our wager below our minimum wager of $5.

We have now covered how you determine the size of each wager. Please remember that this is only part of the complete Maximum Advantage Roulette System. The other major component of the strategy deals exclusively with where you place your bets.

Increasing the Performance of the CRB Strategy

The following table shows some statistics developed from this series of games. This is the same table presented as Table 9 on page 164 in the complete manual. These statistics are fairly representative of any games you decide to play using the CRB Strategy in its original form.

Because they give us an idea of how well the system performs as originally developed, they are worth taking a look at again so that we completely understand how the original system performs. After reviewing the original strategy, we will be better prepared to take a look at advanced strategies that increase the win rate even higher.

Results of 20 Typical Games Using the Original CRB Strategy

Number of Games Played - 20

Games Won - 17

Games Lost - 3

Games Won Percentage - 85%

Games Lost Percentage - 15%

Amount Won - $816

Total Number of Bets (Spins) - 555

Average Win per Bet Made ($816/555) - $1.4703

Average Bets (Spins) per Game (555/20) - 27.75

Average Spins per Winning Game - 23.76

Average Amount Won per Winning Game - $57.05

Average Amount Won per Winning Game Using Betting Series A - $50.93

Average Amount Won per Winning Game Using Betting Series B - $103.00

Looking at this table we can see that we won 17 out of 20 games for a win rate of 85%. This is about what we can expect using the original CRB Strategy.

We won a total of $816 for this series of games. This required making 555 bets. Since we bet on every spin of the roulette wheel, the number of bets is the same as the number of spins of the wheel.

Even including our losing games, we won an average of $1.47 per spin. This is important because we can use this "win rate" to forecast our hourly winnings at different rates of play. We made an average of 27.75 bets per game. At a spin rate of 50 spins per hour, our average game lasted about 33 minutes. At the faster rate of 100 spins per hour (think Internet casinos), it would have taken us just over 16 minutes to wrap up each game.

The average amount we won per winning game was $57.05. The games played using Betting Series A had average wins of $50.95 and the games playing with Betting Series B averaged wins of $103. These amounts are close to our target win amounts of $50 for Series A and $100 for Series B.

The next table presents another way of looking at these statistics.

This table shows what our win rates per hour would be at different bankroll levels and at different rates of play. This illustration will give you a clearer insight into the power of using the original betting strategy.

Win Rates per Hour Comparing Spin Rates and the Size of Betting Series

CRB Strategy - Chart 3

Different Betting Series

The original CRB Strategy uses only two betting series, which I call Series A and Series B. For tables with $5 minimum bets, the base bets for these series are $5 and $10, respectively. These are the only two of many levels of play possible using the Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy. You can gear the level of your play to the size of your bankroll. In fact, one method of play that you may consider is to gradually increase the size of your buy-ins as your bankroll grows.

Increasing the size of your bankroll using casino winnings is an excellent way to leverage your winnings. As shown in the table above, you can increase your hourly win rate to over $500 an hour if you are willing to invest more in a game of roulette.

The next table shows four different levels of play for the CRB Strategy using two betting levels.

Comparative Betting Series Used for Different Levels of Play

CRB Strategy - Chart 4

Here's what the columns mean in the table above.

  • Level - This refers to the level of play. Throughout the examples in the original manual, we have assumed play at Level 1, using
  • Series A and B for this level.
  • Series - Each level of play has two Betting Series, A and B used for that level.
  • Base Bet - The minimum wager for each betting series.
  • + After Loss - The amount added to a losing wager following a losing bet.
  • - After Win - The amount deducted from a losing wager following a winning bet.
  • - After 2 Consecutive Wins - The amount used to compute the size of the next wager following two consecutive winning bets.
  • Game Buy-in - The amount of cash needed to play a game at each level.
  • Total Needed Per Game - The recommended amount of cash needed to play a game at each level. For example, to play a game at Level 1, you will need $500 for a game bankroll. This is higher than the total buy-ins for Series A plus Series B to provide an extra cushion.

Rules for the Controlled Risk Betting Strategy

Before I present some modifications to the original betting rules, let's review them once again just to make sure that you understand the original concepts before I suggest some modifications.

The Controlled Risk Betting Strategy is used to determine the size of each bet you will make. A different Betting Series is associated with each bankroll level.

The amount of money used for a game determines the size of your betting series. The CRB Strategy will work for many different levels of betting, from $1 wagers to $40 bets. The principles remain the same, regardless of the size of the wagers.

Here are the rules governing wagering using $5 minimum bets:

  1. Your base bet is $5. You will never wager an amount smaller than the amount of your base bet in any game.
  2. The maximum bet for using the $5 minimum bet series is $27. If this amount is lost, your next wager will drop to $15. This rule is designed to limit the size of losses.
  3. Following any loss, the next wager is increased by $3.
  4. Following any win, the next wager is reduced by $2.
  5. Following two consecutive wins, the next wager is reduced by $5, subject to making a minimum wager of $5.

In the original approach we added one additional betting series to our first one which used $5 as its base bet.

I called the first betting series, using a $5 base bet, "Series A" and the following betting series, which uses a Base Bet of $10, "Series B."

The rules for betting Series B are as follows:

  1. Your base bet is $10. You will never wager an amount smaller than the amount of your base bet in any game.
  2. The maximum bet for using the $10 minimum bet series is $54. If this amount is lost, your next wager will drop to $30. This rule is designed to limit the size of losses.
  3. Following any loss, the next wager is increased by $6
  4. Following any win, the next wager is reduced by $4.
  5. Following two consecutive wins, the next wager is reduced by $5 subject to making a minimum wager of $10.

For any session of roulette, you will need to be prepared to wager either Betting Series A, with a $5 Base Bet, or Betting Series B, using a $10 Base Bet.

Whenever you start a roulette session, you will use the Series A Bet Selection Method. Following the loss of a game, you will use Series B for one game only.

Thus, we now have two levels of bets. We will use the betting series using $5 Base Bets as our normal method of play.

We will keep Betting Series B available to use only following the loss of a game. Series B is designed to help us recoup a loss more quickly by increasing the size of our base bets after a loss.

The loss rate for losing a Series A level of bets is 15%, with an 85% win rate.

As you shall see, winning at the Series B level mostly recovers the amount of any Series A losses.

The risk of losing two consecutive games, consisting of a Series A and a Series B level game, is very small, calculated as the overall loss rate squared or (0.15 x 015 = 2.25%). Thus, the risk of a large loss, consisting of two back-to-back series losses, is very small and only occurs about once every 44 or 45 games.

The other side to a 2.25% loss rate is a "Series Win Rate" of 97.75%. This is very powerful and a major component of the power of this strategy.

At this point, I want to introduce the concept of reducing the loss rate even further. We can do this by adding a third level to the CRB Strategy.

With a game loss rate of 0.15 per level, the risk of losing three games in a row is calculated as 0.15 x 0.15 x 0.15 or 0.0034.

This is a loss rate of 3.4 games per thousand games played or a loss of one game for every 296 games. In the next chapter we will take a look at the power of adding this third betting level to the CRB Strategy.

Adding Betting Level "C" to the CRB Strategy

An integral part of the CRB Strategy is that it only loses about one out of every 6.67 games and that the losses are small.

Thus, in the original strategy, we adopted the concept of using a higher level of wagers following a losing game. For example, if we are a $5 better and we lose the "A" betting series, based on $5 bets, we can jump to a "B" level of wagers for one game following the loss of a game played at the A level.

Using this concept reduced our risk of two back-to-back losses to once every 44 or 45 games. This is calculated by multiplying the expected loss rate for an individual game by itself to calculate the risk of losing two consecutive games.

Thus, the risk of losing a Series A Level game and a Series B Level game consecutively, or back-to-back is:

0.15 x 0.15 = 0.0225 or 22.5 games per thousand games played.

This is a very low loss rate and any back-to-back losses can be readily absorbed by the player, because the sizes of the losses are never devastating.

Another way of saying this, is that unlike using a Martingale betting series which, when it loses, has very large losses in relation to the size of its wins, the CRB Strategy keeps the size of any losses comparatively low.

Now, lets take a look at expanding the CRB Strategy by adding one more Betting Level. Let's see what can be gained by adding another betting level to the overall strategy.

By adding a new "C" Series to the original A and B series, we can reduce the risk of losses even further. With the addition of a Series C level of wagers, the risk of the loss of all betting series in back-to-back losses is calculated as:

0.15 x 0.15 x 0.15 = 0.003375 or 3.4 games per 1,000 games played.

The following table shows three levels of betting series with a Series C level of wagers added and the betting rules used for each level of wagers.

CRB Betting Levels with a "C" Betting Series Added

CRB Strategy - Chart 5

How Risky Is It to Add Another Betting Level to the CRB Strategy?

If you will refer to the last table in the previous chapter, you can get a good idea of how much using a third betting level will cost you.

Let me rephrase that. As we shall so see, adding this additional betting series to an already potent strategy will actually make money for you.

However, it will "cost you" in the sense that you will need to have enough money to use the strategy.

Looking at the previous table again, you will notice that the last column "Total Bankroll Needed" show the amount of money you need to have to play at each level.

Let's look at the bankroll needs for a $5 better. To play at the "A" level, the $5 player needs to buy in, that is, exchange his cash for playing chips, $150.

To play at the "B" level, which requires making the $10 bet the minimum wager, he will need to buy in for $300.

And, to add a new Level C to his arsenal, he will need $600 for the buy in. Before I would start betting at the Series A level, I would want to be prepared to handle the worst possible situation - the loss of my first three games, back-to-back without a single win.

By the way, this has never happened to me, but since it is possible and will eventually happen to someone, somewhere, I can't ignore being prepared.

So, if we walk into a casino, buy in for a Series A game and lose, and then come back at the Series B level and again lose and finally try at the Series C level and lose yet another game, we will risk about $1,050 at the $5 betting level.

If you will recall that a $5 Martingale series would be:

5 10 20 40 80 160 320 640 and risk a total of $1,275, then the risk of $1,050, with a much lower prospect of losing doesn't look too bad.

Please remember that your risk of a catastrophic loss of all three betting series in a row will occur on the average about once every 296 games.

Aha, you are thinking, that's the hidden danger in this strategy. Even though the risk of losing three consecutive betting series is low, the loss will wipe out all of the profits and prove, once again, that the skeptics are right when they say that the roulette game can't be beaten!

I am a greater believer in actual results, achieved in real casino games, than I am in theory. Using results obtained from actual play, I know that the average net win per game, playing with a $5 Series A and a $10 Series B is $40.30 per game. Rounding this number down to $40, for simplicity, we can compute what our profits would be if we added a Series C betting level and suffered the loss of three consecutive betting series once every 296 games Here's what the loss of all three series once every 296 games will do to our profits:

Winnings Accumulated Before Loss of All Betting Series

296 games x average win of $40 = $12,077

Losses: Series A loss (150)

Series B loss (300)

Series C loss (600)

Adjusted Winnings After Series Losses $11,027

The CRB Strategy holds up very well using these assumptions. But let's push the strategy a little harder.

What if we only won an average of $30 per game at this level. This could happen because we decide to shorten our games, or run into a string of greater than average losing games. For whatever reason, we will assume that we have only averaged clearing $30 per game.

Here's what our adjusted winnings, after suffering three consecutive series losses, would be:

Winnings Accumulated Before Loss of All Betting Series

296 games x average win of $30 = $ 8,880

Losses: Series A loss (150)

Series B loss (300)

Series C loss (600)

Adjusted Winnings After Series Losses $ 7,830

Even with a lower average profit of only $30 per game, our winnings still look pretty good under this assumption.

But what if we lose our three betting series at double the expected rate and we only average $30 profits per game?

Here's our Adjusted Winnings after series losses under this set of assumptions"

Winnings Accumulated Before Loss of All Betting Series

148 games x average win of $30 = $ 5,920

Losses: Series A loss (150)

Series B loss (300)

Series C loss (600)

Adjusted Winnings After Series Losses $ $4,870

The amounts above show our adjusted profits if we have a loss of three consecutive betting series once every 148 games, which is double the expected rate of once every 296 games.

Under these assumptions, we still come out with a profit. Our hourly pay rate will not be as good under these assumptions, but we have to consider that:

  1. These are extreme assumptions of having both a lower than average profit per game and a complete series loss rate at double the expected rate.
  2. We can counter this by gradually increasing the size of our buy-ins and the size of the betting series used as our winnings accumulate. This approach has been proven to increase the average hourly win rate enough to more than offset the risk of the loss of all three betting series.

How Does Using a Third Betting Series Affect Our Bankroll Requirements?

I normally recommend using a gambling bankroll at least five times larger than the amount risked per individual game.

Using this formula at the $5 betting level only, using betting Series A and B, I recommended a total bankroll of $2,500 in the original manual on Maximum Advantage Roulette.

Maximum Advantage Roulette Base Bets, Session Size and Original Recommended Bankroll Requirements

CRB Strategy - Chart 5

It's pretty easy to see how I came up with these numbers. For $5 play, we know that it takes $150 to play at the Series A level and $300 for Series B. Combining these amounts gives us a total of $450. For this table, I rounded this amount up to $500 and computed a total bankroll requirement of $2,500.

If we decide to add Series C to our betting scheme, we know that we need $600 for our buy-in for Series C. Using our old formula for computing our bankroll needs, we can first add up the playing amounts needed for each betting level for $5 bettors as :

Amount needed for Series A $ 150

Amount Needed for Series B 300

Amount Needed for Series C 600

Total Bankroll Needed for Series $1,050

Total Bankroll Needed (multiply Total Bankroll Needed for Series x 5 (1,050 x 5) = $5,250

I don’t know about you, but this seems like a pretty heavy requirement for making $5 bets. In fact, it is high enough that most gamblers will dismiss this system because the bankroll requirements are too high.

After I added the third "C" level of bets and calculated the expected loss rate of a "Series Loss" once every 296 games, I decided to take another look at the bankroll requirements. What my research showed is really good news if you either don't have much money to risk gambling or just don't want to bother assembling such a large bankroll.

I found that you don't have to increase the size of your bankroll in order to add the Series C level of bets. In fact, instead of recommending that you use a larger bankroll to accommodate the additional bets, I recommend that you reduce your bankroll.

I have found that to be successful using the third betting level, you only need to have a bankroll equal to the total buy-in requirements of the three betting series.

Following this assumption, our bankroll requirements for the different betting levels become:

Recommended Bankroll Requirements When The Third Betting Level is Added

CRB Strategy - Chart 6

What About Adding a Fourth Betting Level?

I hope you are as intrigued as I am with results obtained by adding a third betting level "C" to the CRB Strategy.

Has it occurred to you that adding a fourth betting level might also make sense?

I am certainly impressed with the idea. At this stage in the development of the system, I will have to give you my best thoughts on the theory of the idea.

This is not because I haven't used the Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy enough to test these concepts. I have, and adding the third level of bets definitely works.

So far, I have only experienced two Series C losses out of 738 casino games. This is slightly lower than the expected Series C loss rate of once every 296 games, but it is well within the expectations of normal fluctuations in results.

However, I have never tried using a fourth or Series D level of play. In each of the cases when I suffered three consecutive losses of betting Series A, B and C, I stopped play and when I resumed, I started over at the Series A level. This is the conservative approach called for in the strategy. Whenever you are unfortunate enough to lose all of your betting series in back to back losses, you simply start over.

So, the concept of adding a fourth "Series D" level is untested. However, I can approximate the results of adding one more betting level to the betting schematic. I should first tell you that in the two cases where I lost all three betting series in consecutive games and started over, I won the first games when I resumed play. If I had played at the Series D Level at these two times, I would have been successful with winning games.

The theory of adding a fourth betting level looks good. If we take another look at the risk of a loss of all three betting series with just Series C added, we have: 0.15 x 0.15 x 0.15 = 0.003375 or 3.4 games per 1,000 games played.

Now we will calculate the risk of a loss of four consecutive betting series with a Series D added.

Our calculation with Series D added is: 0.15 x 0.15 x 0.15 x 0.15 = 0.003375 or .51 games per 1,000 games played.

I think I can live with the possibility of losing about one-half of a Series loss per 1,000 games played. This works out to one expected loss for every 1,975.7 games, or roughly once in every 2,000 games.

The following table shows the CRB Betting Levels with a "D" series of bets added.

CRB Betting Levels with a "D" Betting Series Added

CRB Strategy - Chart 7

With the addition of Series D, the Total Bankroll requirements for a $5 bettor jumps from $1,050 to $2,250.

Before you blanche at this increase in required bankroll and decide to forego using Series D, let me point out that you might not have to increase your bankroll at all to become a Series D convert.

What if you took the position that you will only resort to ever using Series D if your winnings are already in excess of some predetermined amount?

For example, as a $5 bettor, you might decide that you will only use Series D if your winnings are already in excess of $5,000. This would be a fairly realistic assumption. Let's consider again what the loss of the A, B and C Series consecutively will do to our profits when we have a loss at the predicted rate of once every 296 games:

Winnings Accumulated Before Loss of All Betting Series

296 games x average win of $40 = $12,077

Losses: Series A loss (150)

Series B loss (300)

Series C loss (600)

Adjusted Winnings After Series Losses $11,027

With Adjusted Winnings after losing a Betting Level C series, we should, on the average, be in good position to jump to the Series D level one game, with its requirement of a $1,200 buy-in. If we approach using Series D this way, then we don't have to increase our bankroll at all in order to profit by using this series.

Summary of New Risk Adjustment Strategies

There is no question that adding the "C" Betting Level and even a "D" Betting Level increases the potency of the Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy.

With just the addition of the C Betting Series, we reduce our risk of losing all of our betting series from once every 44 to 45 games, using just the A and B Betting Series, down to the remote possibility of a loss once every 296 games, after adding the C Betting Series.

If we add a "D" Level Betting Series, we reduce our risk of losing all betting series down to the very rare case of once in every 1,976 games! I have frankly shared with you that I have never tried the D level Betting Series in actual play, but our analysis indicates that using this Betting Series should increase our win rate even more!

To get you up and running as quickly as possible with these new "Risk Adjustment" Strategies, I will review both the logic behind these adjustments and give you some sound advice on exactly how you can integrate them into your play and become an even more effective player!

1. Learn the Original System

Before you can add the new strategies to your play, you need to be competent using the original Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy. Please remember that CRB Strategy is only part of the Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy. You must use the whole strategy to achieve satisfactory results. Thus, the discussions that follow only cover the "bet size" part of the complete strategy. Before you decide to test these modifications by playing roulette, you will want to make sure that you are using the complete strategy as it is described in the.

The other major component of the strategy deals exclusively with where you place your bets. You need to use both the CRB Strategy and the Adaptive Pattern Betting Strategy in order to be successful with this method of play.

All of the examples of hourly win rates, projections, bankroll requirements and the measurement of results of using the Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy were developed using the complete system.

2. The Original system wins a very high percentage of the time.

Even though our overall win rate is improved by incorporating the strategic changes discussed in this book, it is important to remember that the Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy is a potent method of play in its own right.

In fact, when you couple the original betting strategy with the rest of the principles used in the complete system, you will win 97.75% of the time. This is a very high win rate, yet, amazingly, it is done with low risk.

3. The CRB Strategy Rules

The Betting Strategy employed by the Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy is a powerful method of play. It has the double virtue of producing respectable wins, while keeping the size of the bets required to small levels.

It is a system based on raising the size of your wagers after wins and lowering them after losses.

The principles used in this strategy apply to all levels of play. While the dollar amounts involved will change by playing level, or because of different Betting Levels used at any single level of play, the principles remain exactly the same, regardless of the level of play. A $5 better will use exactly the same rules as a $100 better. The only difference is the size of their bets.

Before you can effectively use the new Risk Strategies introduced in this book, you must have the basic playing rules for the CRB Strategy down cold.

Here are the CRB Strategy rules governing wagering using $5 minimum bets:

  1. Your base bet is $5. Your will never wager an amount smaller than the amount of your base bet in any game.
  2. The maximum bet for using the $5 minimum bet series is $27. If this amount is lost, your next wager will drop to $15. This rule is designed to limit the size of losses.
  3. Following any loss, the next wager is increased by $3.
  4. Following any win, the next wager is reduced by $2.
  5. Following two consecutive wins, the next wager is reduced by $5, subject to making a minimum wager of $5.

Improving Your Overall Win Rate

How would you like to reduce the possibility of the loss of your bankroll down as low .338%? Just so we understand this number, I am talking about a system that would entail a major loss once in every 296 games. Another way of saying this is that you could expect to lose a complete series of games about 3.38 times per 1,000 games played.

That is exactly what the modifications in playing strategy suggested in this manual accomplish. In fact, we even ventured so far as to introduce what may be called the "ultimate betting strategy" where a series loss would occur on the average just once every 1,976 games!

We have covered a lot of ground in this supplemental manual. We have modified the original strategy to the point that the risk of loss is very, very tiny.

What About the Risk of Loss?

As developed in the original strategy, the risk of losing two consecutive games, consisting of a Series A and a Series B level game, is very small, calculated as the overall loss rate squared or (0.15 x 015 = 2.25%). Thus, the risk of a large loss, consisting of two back-to-back series losses, is very small and only occurs about once every 44 or 45 games.

The other side to a 2.25% loss rate is a "Series Win Rate" of 97.75%. This is very powerful and a major component of the power of this strategy.

However, we have learned how to reduce the risk of a loss of all betting series even further. We can do this by adding a third Betting Series to the already potent CRB Strategy. With a game loss rate of 0.15 per game lost, the risk of losing three games in a row is calculated as 0.15 x 0.15 x 0.15 or 0.0034. This is a loss rate of 3.4 games per thousand games played or a loss of one game for every 296 games played.

Adding the "C" Betting Series

By adding a new "C" Series to the original A and B series, we can reduce the risk of losses even further.

With the addition of a Series C level of wagers, the risk of the loss of all betting series in back-to-back losses is calculated as: 0.15 x 0.15 x 0.15 = 0.003375 or 3.4 games per 1,000 games played.

But How Much More Risk is There When You Add the C Betting Level?

Any time you raise the size of your buy-in in a casino game, you are placing more of your money at risk. This is exactly what you are required to do when you implement the C Series. Just how much more risk do you face when you do this? Let's take a look.

The worst thing that can happen to you when you are playing is to lose all of your Betting Series one right after the other. This is equivalent to a system meltdown. This is the issue that ultimately sinks most systems (such as most Martingale-based betting schemes).

Will the loss of three back-to-back betting series destroy the efficiency of the Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy?

Here's what the a loss of all three series once every 296 games will do to our profits:

Winnings Accumulated Before Loss of All Betting Series

296 games x average win of $40 = $12,077

Losses: Series A loss (150)

Series B loss (300)

Series C loss (600)

Adjusted Winnings After Series Losses $11,027

The CRB Strategy holds up very well using these assumptions. I gave you even more examples in the manual. You can average winning a lot less per hour than this example and even lose all three series more frequently than once every 296 games, and the system is still very profitable!

The Original System's Bankroll Requirements

The original Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy using just two levels of betting series (levels A and B), has predefined bankroll requirements as shown in the following table.

For your reference, Table 16 from page 264, showing the original manual's recommended bankroll requirements has been reproduced below:

Maximum Advantage Roulette Base Bets, Session Size and Original Recommended Bankroll Requirements

CRB Strategy - Chart 8

How Much More Bankroll Do We Need to Add Betting Series C?

Using the same formula that was used to compute the bankroll needed to use Series A and B Betting levels we can compute the  amounts of bankroll we need for different levels of play with a Series C Betting Level added.

In computing our bankroll needs, we can first add up the playing amounts needed for each betting level for $5 bettors as:

Amount needed for Series A $ 150

Amount Needed for Series B 300

Amount Needed for Series C 600

Total Bankroll Needed for Series $1,050

Total Bankroll Needed (multiply Total Bankroll Needed for Series x 5 (1,050 x 5) = $5,250

I don’t know about you, but this seems like a pretty heavy requirement for making $5 bets. In fact, it is high enough that most gamblers will dismiss this system because the bankroll requirements are too high.

Good News For Your Bankroll Needs

You don't have to increase the size of your bankroll in order to add the Series C level of bets. In fact, instead of recommending that you use a larger bankroll to accommodate the additional bets, I recommend that you reduce your bankroll. Let me explain how we reached this conclusion.

Losses requiring that you move up to the C level betting series occur very infrequently (on the average you will play at the C level once every 44 or 45 games). In general by the time the conditions exist for you to play at the C level, you will have earned enough to have more than enough bankroll.

Because of the extraordinary "earning power" of this system, I have found that you can add the Series C Betting level and simultaneously reduce the size of the bankroll needed to play at each level.

The next table shows the revised bankroll requirements for each level of play, recognizing the "earning capacity" of the overall strategy.

Recommended Bankroll Requirements When C Betting Level is Added

CRB Strategy - Chart 9

Adding a "D" Level Betting Series

On the average, about once every 296 games we will lose A, B and C betting levels in back-to-back losses.

There are two options when this occurs. You can consider the betting progressions to be finished and resume betting the "A" level the next time you play.

Or, you can decide to add yet one more betting level to your arsenal.

Let's first take a look at how much more risk we will have with the addition of a D level betting series.

Our greatest risk is the loss of all four betting series in four consecutive games. Now we will calculate the risk of a loss of four consecutive betting series with a Series D added.

Our calculation with Series D added is: 0.15 x 0.15 x 0.15 x 0.15 = 0.003375 or .51 games per 1,000 games played.

Another way to looking at this loss rate. On the average, you will lose a series of games once every 1,975.7 games.

Revised CRB Betting Levels

The following table shows the Betting Series when using A, B, C and D Betting Levels.

CRB Betting Levels with a "D" Betting Series Added

CRB Strategy - Chart 10

How Much Bankroll Do We Need If We Add a Series D Betting Level?

Before we answer the question about how much, if any, we need to adjust our bankroll in order to add Series D to our arsenal of betting tools, let's take a look at what our average profit position should look like after losing Series A, B and C in back-to-back losses.

A $5 bettor using the Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy with Betting Levels A, B and C will win about $40 per average game (including expected losses).

On the average, he will need to use Series D once every 296 games on the average as this is the expected frequency of having the requisite consecutive losses of Betting Levels A, B and C.

The calculations below show what our average position would be after playing 296 games with average profits of $40 each and then losing all three betting series.

Winnings Accumulated Before Loss of All Betting Series

296 games x average win of $40 = $12,077

Losses: Series A loss (150)

Series B loss (300)

Series C loss (600)

Adjusted Winnings After Series Losses $11,027

With Adjusted Winnings of $11,027 after losing a Betting Level C series, we should, on the average, be in good position to jump to the Series D level one game, with its requirement of a $1,200 buy-in.

If we approach using Series D in this way, then we don't have to increase our bankroll at all in order to profit by using this series.

We will earn enough between the situations requiring the use of Series D, that is, we can add the use of this Series to our strategy without having to carry a higher bankroll.

In effect, we can add both Series C and D levels of play, without adding more bankroll. In reality, we do even better than this as our analysis shows that we can actually reduce the amount of Total Bankroll we need, because of the added efficiencies gained using Series C and D.

Using the New Risk Adjustment Strategies

You want to keep four major principles in mind in modifying the original Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy to include using Betting Series C and D.

  1. You will need to completely follow the rules for the complete Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy with the only exceptions being the new special rules for the new Betting Series. As stated earlier, you will need to use both of the major components of the overall strategy, the CRB Strategy and The Adaptive Pattern Betting Strategy.
  2. Do not engage in prolonged games in order to prevent or try to defer recognizing a loss. The correct average number of spins per game is between 25 and 30. If your games are consistently longer, then you are playing too long. Recognize the loss and move on.
  3. Don't shorten your games because of fear of losses. If your games are significantly shorter than 25 to 30 spins, they are probably too short. However, if you have to err, it is better to "hit and run" even a little faster than to overstay your welcome.
  4. Use the changed bankroll requirements and strictly follow rules. If you do, you will reduce your risk of loss and simultaneously increase your hourly win rate.

Adjustments After Losing a Betting Series

If you have just lost a Betting Series, this is your trigger to adjust the size of your Betting Level. Normally, you will move up to the next betting level after a loss and then move back to the original betting level after a win.

Below are the rules you should follow after losing a series under different sets of assumptions.

  1. If you use just the original A and B Betting Levels, then following a loss you will move up one Series after any loss of A series. After completing one game at B level, resume playing at A level until another loss occurs.
  2. If you use A, B and C Betting Series, then you have two options following a series Loss.
    1. Preferred: Move up one Series after any series loss. Revert to using Series A after any win at any other level. Example. Lose Series A and Series B, play Series C and win. Next game revert back to Series A
    2. Aggressive Play with A, B and C Series. Move up one series after a loss and down one series after a win. At the A and B Series levels this is no different than the original strategy. However, if you lose two back-to-back games at A and then B levels, play at C level and win, the preferred strategy is to move back down to Series A after winning at level C. This is the strategy I have used and is the one that the win/loss statistics I have given you are based on. If you play aggressively, instead of going all the way back to Series A, you will move back to Series B following a win at Series Level C. By making this move, you will win about 6.67 winning games for every losing one. However, you will lose 1 game in 6.67 games on the average and be called upon to increase your wagers to Series C. For this reason you should plan on having a greater bankroll if you decide to use the aggressive approach.
  3. If you decide to use A, B, C and D Series you have two options. You can either use Preferred or Aggressive Styles of play with Series A, B and C. However, I would never play very aggressively at the D level because of the amount of money risked.
    1. Preferred play after a win at D level is to drop all the way back to Series A for the next game.
    2. Aggressive play would consist of dropping back to Series B after a win at Series D level. However, I would never drop back to Series C after winning at Series D. The risk of a loss forcing me right back up to the Series D level is just too great.

Conclusion

If you are already using the Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy you will see the immediate benefits of modifying the original strategy and adding Betting Series C and D to your betting levels.

This is truly a low cost move, since it will increase your win rate and actually lower your bankroll requirements. If you are very conservative, you don't have to reduce your bankroll requirements. Just incorporate the new betting series in your play and enjoy the benefits.

If you have not yet acquired the original manual and are not sure that this money-making approach is right for you, please consider this.

The Maximum Advantage Roulette Strategy really does give you a "maximum advantage" over the roulette game.

Thousands of hours of play have confirmed that our players really do consistently win in both real and virtual casinos.

I recently conducted an interesting experiment. I decided to see just how well I could do if I started with a minimum bankroll and reinvested all of my profits in my gambling bankroll.